Uncategorized

An alternative away from our throw away culture

Sustainability has become ever more important as the climate continues to change drastically. It takes the effort from each of us to create real change in the management of our waste and pollution. One of the key places to become more sustainable at home is to create a circular economy. The old economy Our existing […]

Words:
Images:
Back to top

Sustainability has become ever more important as the climate continues to change drastically. It takes the effort from each of us to create real change in the management of our waste and pollution. One of the key places to become more sustainable at home is to create a circular economy.

The old economy

Our existing economy is linear, which means items are produced, used, and then discarded. This is obviously a wasteful economy that exploits our natural resources and creates unending mountains of waste. The result is increased pollution and further exploitation, leading to loss of natural habitat and polluted land, water, and air. 

What is a circular economy? 

A circular economy is a procedure that eliminates waste and uses fewer resources. It means changing the way we produce, consume, and discard products and services we buy. A circular economy is also about making the most of what we have and making our things last as long as possible. The key is to avoid purchasing new items until it’s absolutely necessary. 

In addition, a circular economy also considers the materials used to produce products and services and how these can be reused and repaired as much as possible. When these items and services are used up and no longer repairable, they must be recycled in an environmentally sustainable manner. 

A circular economy is the complete opposite of a linear economy. It places more emphasis on sustainability in production, reusing, and recycling. This system creates much less waste, reduces carbon emissions, and ensures everything is used to the fullest. 

Introducing the Circular Economy at Home

It’s no secret that we need to change our ways, but is it possible to implement the circular economy at home? Yes, it is! You can have a direct impact on your family’s sustainability by practising the circular economy. We’ve put together some tips to help you get started. 

1. Avoid buying waste producing items

The very first place to start is generally at the beginning, which is what we buy. Take a conscious look at what you purchase. Do you usually buy items that have unnecessary packaging? Do you buy food that’s wrapped in plastic? If so, these are places you can start to eliminate the linear cycle and transition into the circular economy. 

Rather than buying groceries wrapped in cardboard and plastic, consider buying fresh foods at the local farmer’s market. Fresh food generally doesn’t require as much packaging. Take your own containers to buy bulk foods at the market. Then when you get that fresh food home, make sure to use it all before it spoils.

The same method can be applied to clothing. For instance, buy clothing made in your country and with natural fibres. Wear and repair the clothing as needed. When it’s worn out, then recycle the fabric. The material can be made into other clothes, household items, and more. The buttons can be saved and reused too. 

You cut waste, save money, and help the environment by making conscientious purchases. 

2.  Pay attention to what goes in the bin

Another way to practice the circular economy at home is to pay attention to what you throw out. Watch to see how much of what you buy each week gets thrown away, recycled, reused or repaired. 

When you stop and analyse what’s being thrown away, you get a better idea of what may be recycled, reused, or repaired. Maybe your teen threw away some jeans that had a minor hole in one seam. This could be easily repaired and reused or even traded for other clothing. 

That’s just one example. Consider the electronics that may be going into the bin. Did you try to fix them first? Could you have donated that old computer rather than throwing it in the trash? Pay closer attention to what you’re throwing away and how much of it really needs to go into the landfill. 

3. Reuse and repurpose

Another way to practise the circular economy at home is to reuse and repurpose items you own. For instance, you may have containers that could be reused to store food and other items. Do you have baby food jars left over? If so, you could reuse these in creative ways if you’re a bit crafty. Baby food jars can be made into pretty candles (even given as gifts); they’re perfect to use as spice jars, can be used for homemade paint, or up-cycled into pretty storage jars. 

4. Repair 

What do you do with shoes that develop a hole or need a new sole? Do you throw them away? Why not consider visiting a cobbler (they still exist) and getting the shoes fixed? While that may not be as satisfying as buying a new pair, repairing and reusing your shoes is best for the environment. 

Learn how to fix garments that need mending rather than disposing of them. It’s generally quite easy to learn how to fix small appliances, your computer, and more. And it may be possible to bargain with neighbours who can do these repairs for you. Offer to fix something for them or barter with home-grown veggies to get your things repaired. 

5. Reuse

What happens when you become bored with your wardrobe? Do you throw things out and buy new things? This can be a huge waste of materials and cause immense damage to the environment through ever-growing landfills. So, why not consider hosting a swapping event? Alternatively make a little extra cash by selling preloved items on a variety of apps.

Summing it up

The key to implementing a circular economy at home is getting creative and being conscious of what you buy and throw away. Making more informed decisions, changing habits, and buying items that can be reused are key to a circular economy. 

What’s more, this is a process that must start in each of our homes. When we all take the right actions to become more sustainable, together, we help our planet. 

What is the business case for sustainability?

Thursday 21 February 2024, 1:00-2:00 PM

-1days
This site is registered on Toolset.com as a development site.